Toxins in Food and the Environment and Their Effect on Our Health

Published on Mar 24, 2016

Anna had stopped by my office today for a six month follow up. Anna is a 25 year old woman who complained of chronic pain with sex a year ago. Anna lives in Texas and had come to see me because she did not feel that the physicians she had seen for this problem in Texas were able to help her with her condition. After a complete history and physical evaluation, the source of her condition became clear to me. She had suffered with this pain for so long that any thought of penetration or manipulation of the genitalia created anticipation of pain which magnified her condition. With detailed explanation of the findings, a course of action was planned that gradually resolved the source of the pain and allowed Anna to enjoy intimacy with her partner.

This is a common occurrence in my office. On a daily basis, I see women who have suffered from pain with intercourse for years. The oldest patient, who was 73 years old, wondered why no one diagnosed the problem that had given her so much pain and led to an avoidance of intimacy.

At any one time, 30 million women complain of pain with intercourse. One third of all women have pain with intercourse that lasts more than 3 months. The pain can occur with arousal, penetration, intercourse and sometimes even after intercourse. It is also possible that the pain during intercourse overlaps with other pelvic conditions such as endometriosis, fibroids or interstitial cystitis.

In my experience, women with chronic sexual pain feel confused and frustrated. As a result, they have low libido, avoid sexual activity, suffer from increased anxiety and depression and increased relationship difficulties. A third do not seek care and those that do are usually not satisfied with the treatments received because very few physicians, even OB/GYNs, understand or have any experience in treating chronic pain with sex.

Fortunately, as Anna and many of our patients can attest, with expert care, sexual pain can resolve or improve, normal function can be restored, and quality of life can improve.

Medtronic Bladder Control Therapy for Urinary Incontinence

Published on Mar 15, 2016

“Did you know we can put in a pacemaker for your bladder?”, I asked my 55 year old patient with chronic urinary incontinence. “A pacemaker for my bladder?”, she replied in disbelief.

Many are surprised to hear what we do to help women control their urinary incontinence problems. For the past 15 years, a therapy developed by the Medtronic has helped women control the symptoms of urge and frequency and incomplete bladder emptying. Now, it can also be used for stool incontinence.

Urge incontinence is a condition where a woman has to run to the bathroom frequently and can lose urine on the way. Other symptoms may include multiple episodes of urination at nights, feeling of pressure in the lower abdomen and spontaneous urine loss, even though most times urine loss is associated with desire to urinate. There are many therapies for urge incontinence which involve diet, fluid restriction, medication and pelvic muscle therapy. However, once these fail, the pacemaker becomes one of the viable options that should be considered.

So, yes! After most therapies fail, we do place pacemakers for bladders with great success. Approximately, 60-70% of women that fail the conventional therapy for urge incontinence improve with pacemaker therapy. In order to identify women that are eligible, special testing is performed that help with correct diagnosis and increase the success from the therapy. The procedure is safe and outpatient and for many, including this patient, a “life saver”.

Compounded Testosterone Cream

Published on Mar 15, 2016

Testosterone is an essential hormone in a woman’s body. It is commonly known as a male hormone because men need a higher level of testosterone in their bodies. It peaks in women at the age of 20 and declines in perimenopausal years. They drop to their lowest levels during menopause as the ovaries cease to function.

Low levels of testosterone may be responsible for a decreased desire for sex, decreased satisfaction with sexual relations, decreased metabolism and mid body weight gain, as well as weak muscle tone and fatigue. Women using testosterone may benefit from increased desire and satisfaction with sex, including an increased sex drive. Testosterone also helps increase muscle tone and bone health. It can increase metabolism and mid line weight loss. It has also been helpful in helping women with fatigue issues, helping regain vitality and energy.

Some women are concerned about increased body or facial hair growth, or scalp hair loss, as well as problems with thickening of the voice. However, these conditions are unlikely if the hormone levels are regulated in the range that is normal for women. We use compounded testosterone cream that is prepared just for your body’s needs. It is in the form of a cream that is applied to the skin at night.

Creams are absorbed through the skin and do not involve the liver. Therefore, it does not increase cholesterol and is not expected to increase the risk of blood clots, which is of significant concern with other types of hormone preparation. All compounded hormones that we dispense are prepared by expert pharmacists in our office and the dosage is regulated within very strict standards to deliver the maximum benefit to your body. Dr. Tahery has been prescribing compounded hormones for women for more than 20 years and is known as an expert in menopause and hormone therapy for women of all ages.

Patient Suffers from Chronic Pain with Sex

Published on Mar 15, 2016

Anna had stopped by my office today for a six month follow up. Anna is a 25 year old woman who complained of chronic pain with sex a year ago. Anna lives in Texas and had come to see me because she did not feel that the physicians she had seen for this problem in Texas were able to help her with her condition. After a complete history and physical evaluation, the source of her condition became clear to me. She had suffered with this pain for so long that any thought of penetration or manipulation of the genitalia created anticipation of pain which magnified her condition. With detailed explanation of the findings, a course of action was planned that gradually resolved the source of the pain and allowed Anna to enjoy intimacy with her partner.

This is a common occurrence in my office. On a daily basis, I see women who have suffered from pain with intercourse for years. The oldest patient, who was 73 years old, wondered why no one diagnosed the problem that had given her so much pain and led to an avoidance of intimacy.

At any one time, 30 million women complain of pain with intercourse. One third of all women have pain with intercourse that lasts more than 3 months. The pain can occur with arousal, penetration, intercourse and sometimes even after intercourse. It is also possible that the pain during intercourse overlaps with other pelvic conditions such as endometriosis, fibroids or interstitial cystitis.

In my experience, women with chronic sexual pain feel confused and frustrated. As a result, they have low libido, avoid sexual activity, suffer from increased anxiety and depression and increased relationship difficulties. A third do not seek care and those that do are usually not satisfied with the treatments received because very few physicians, even OB/GYNs, understand or have any experience in treating chronic pain with sex.

Fortunately, as Anna and many of our patients can attest, with expert care, sexual pain can resolve or improve, normal function can be restored, and quality of life can improve.

Hormonal Headaches and Migraines

Published on Mar 1, 2016

Changes in estrogen and progesterone levels during the cycles may cause headaches in some women complaining of pain prior and during the menstrual cycles. Prior and during the menstrual cycle these hormone levels drop and are at the lowest levels . These headaches happen regularly with each cycle and resolve as the estrogen and progesterone levels begin to rise in the first week of the cycle.

During menopause and pregnancy, hormonal migraines usually resolve since the fluctuations in hormonal levels also disappear. However, with birth control use or hormone therapy, the headaches may return.

Many treatment options, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and natural hormone therapy, are effective in treatment of these headaches. But prior to any treatment, the correct diagnosis must be made and treatment must be supervised by an expert physician. Ask us about your headaches and we will be happy to help.

Hormonal Contraceptives and Decreased Sex Drive

Published on Mar 1, 2016

Many women on hormonal contraceptives complain of decreased sex drive and vaginal dryness. In fact a recent study shows that 1 in 5 women reported lack of interest in sex after 6 months on the contraceptives. Hormonal birth controls such as pills, shots, or under the skin implants release hormones that effect the entire body and alter the normal ovarian hormone production. This likely is due to the effect of the systemic hormones on the function and production of ovarian hormones estradiol and testosterone.

In some women the estradiol levels sink so low that many complain of vaginal dryness and pain with intercourse. Decrease in testosterone production is also a common effect of the hormonal birth control. Low testosterone levels may be responsible for decreased sex drive and desire, and fatigue.

Hormonal Intrauterine Device (IUD) is the only birth control method that does not alter sex drive and actually may improve participants sex life by reliably decreasing the chance of contraceptive failure. This method works within the lining of the uterus and the amount of hormones absorbed into the body through the uterus is minimal. Therefore it’s effect on the ovarian hormone production is minimal.

Numerous studies have shown that hormonal IUD is safe for all women of any age with minimal side effects. Dr. Tahery’s technique of IUD insertion minimizes pain associated with insertion and virtually eliminates the chance of uterine perforation during a blind insertion. Also IUD placement is done in a sterile environment in order to eliminate the chances of infection.